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Plants held at Roseland House On these pages I have tried to pull together all the various sources of information I have found and been given over the years relating to Lapageria. Many people like me will have found Noel (in the Nappa valley, California) and his Lapageria.com web pages (No longer there sadly), and been captivated by all the different varieties and the stories behind them. Noel has moved on from growing Lapageria but has given his permission to reproduce some of Lapageria.com's content now that that web site is no more. The torch was picked up by Carlos Rendon the volunteer propagator of Lapageria at Berkeley botanic gardens, who not only produced a large range of plants for sale at the garden but put up on the Berkeley Botanic web pages much Lapageria information. Then there is the Cornish connection as documented by Christian lamb in her article.

Finally there are a number of pages related to growing and propagating Lapageria, as you will see no two growers use exactly the same method! 

I hope over time to add more information and pictures, so anyone that has any details of Lapageria, or the people and places involved I would love to hear from you. charlie@roselandhouse.co.uk 

A number of people have given me both material and help with these pages, Ashley Basil, Carlos Rendon, Mike Jeans, and Noel Gieleghem, but any mistakes are mine, and if I am alerted to them I will correct them.

History and natural range
Elbert E Reed of El Vergel
Christian Lambs article
Carlos Rendon at Berkeley
Rennie Moffat
Propagation methods
Pages from Lapageria.com
With only one species in the Genus Lapageria the National collection comprises for the most part of "Cultivars"                              In the case of Lapageria these are not hybrids but selected forms that have either been spotted in the wild and introduced to gardens or have turned up from the seed produced by garden plants. More of these non standard forms turn up when grown together in gardens for two reasons, firstly the genetic material is more diverse so the chance of something odd increases, and secondly its chances of survival are much greater in a garden situation.